"In everyone you meet there’s a landscape of stories they could tell you - stories that shape the facets of their future, the people of their past and the state of their presence. Like that of the story of how I met Solomon Golding.”                            

Following an interview with Solomon Golding by Cecilie Harris in print issue 12 ‘Young Hearts’, filmmaker Fenn O’Meally ventured out on a mission to dig deeper into the character that is Solomon. They spoke about role model Carlos Acosta, a Cuban ballet dancer, and how he helped plough the way for a dancer such as Solomon to be the first black British ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet. “There hadn’t been a dancer like Carlos Acosta before he had come along.” He expresses a positive outlook on the future of ballet. “Times have really changed within ballet. It’s a lot more colourful.”

"I am a filmmaker, a female filmmaker. I started life in this industry as what was termed a ‘budding journalist’. I have always been driven by the notion of unearthing the hidden facets of another’s novel; a novel like Solomon’s. When I met Solomon we clicked, the kind of click that only siblings can master. Weirdly I felt like I’d known him for the two decades that constitute my life."

Solomon Golding is a profoundly passionate human being breaking down old barriers. He is however modest about his position, a truly graceful ballet dancer in all ways imaginable. Although he speaks highly of previous pioneers, he his now also joining the ranks as a role model for future hopeful talents. It’s important that his words are out there - inspiring those who might be discouraged to follow their dreams out of fear of not being accepted. “It’s everyone’s. It doesn’t just belong to a certain few. I’m just excited to see what happens in the future.” And that is how Solomon sees ballet, “it’s everyone’s”

Interview and thoughts by Fenn O'Meally
Introduction by Hedvig Werner.

The Humble Swallow